6 issues for $14.97 Subscribe Now
Subscribe via RSS Feed

Five Public Speaking Tips

[ 0 ] Jul. 28, 2014 | SBO Editor

Public speaking

Boost your brand behind the microphone. Five public speaking fundamentals for business owners.

By Scott Topper

As he approached the podium, Taylor could feel his face begin to redden and the perspiration building on his palms. He mentally recited his opening line with each step to center-stage, hoping above all else that he did not stumble over his words, or worse, draw a complete blank. His business was still in its infancy—it had been less than 18 months since he officially opened the doors—but the immediate dent he aimed to make in his market was more like a surface-scratch, and it became blindingly apparent that new avenues must be explored to expand his brand and increase companywide profitability. He shook off the looming nerves, adjusted the microphone and began to speak.

Many business owners can identify with Taylor’s anxiety and apprehension, as the stage is leagues away from the comfort-zone of the boardroom. Addressing a crowd of contemporaries is vastly different than delivering a presentation to a small group of colleagues, but nevertheless, speeches are one of the premiere channels for brand construction, and public speaking prowess is a rubber-stamp to your status as a thought-leader in your field.

Public Speaking Fundamentals

There’s an inaccurate belief in business that only professional speakers should talk publicly. The truth is that only a small number of people who are actively speaking at local events, conferences and meetings are professional speakers. Most of them do it for product and service promotion or expanded visibility for themselves or their brand. When you employ these five fundamentals, you can become a great public speaker and learn to market yourself successfully.

1. Assess Your Skills and Knowledge

The first thing you should do is to assess your skills and abilities. Are there any topics that you’re an expert on? Let’s say you’re passionate about healthy eating and fitness. You could use your knowledge to help people understand the importance of good nutrition. Write engaging speeches about organic food and its benefits or talk about the role of physical activity in disease prevention. Show people how they can lose weight without starving themselves or spending a fortune on supplements. Just think about how many topics you could cover in your speeches!

If you’re a business professional, you can talk about the most effective marketing techniques and help people improve their lives. Show them how to start a business, attract more customers, and promote their products more effectively. If you’re a blogger, you can host webinars and teach your audience about Internet marketing. Regardless of your field, you can use your skills to educate and inform people—and create a steady income, as well.

2. Create Your Statement and Share Your Story

Your primary goal when delivering a speech is to engage the audience with a dynamic message that creates value and resonates in their minds. Create a clear statement of what you do and how you can help customers.

If you want to grow your business, focus on shaping a successful brand that tells your story and inspires people to take action, and craft a presentation that imparts your values and ideals on your audience. The most influential speakers have something special to say; they speak from personal experience and share real life stories that engage and motivate people. Personal stories are easy to relate to and have the greatest impact on your audience. If you want to become a good speaker, come up with something new—make the mundane interesting. Encourage your audience to see things from a new perspective.

3. Rehearse, Practice and Scrutinize

As the old adage goes, “Practice makes perfect,” and this is especially true when building your business and reputation through public speaking. Scrutinizing each and every aspect of your speech, committing it to memory and rehearsing in front of a small group of people will help allay any pre-performance anxieties.

Public speaking can be a risky business. Drawing a blank, failing to engage the audience or forgetting a line is entirely possible while onstage, but with constant practice, you diminish the risk of all of them. It’s important to understand that starting a public speaking business requires hard work and commitment. Anyone can become a good speaker with persistent practice, but this doesn’t mean it’s easy.

4. Contact Local and National Associations

When all of the legwork involving crafting an insightful, engaging speech is complete, you need to find your audience. Many neophytes in the speaking world are confounded regarding the ins-and-outs of securing engagements, but it can be as simple as marketing yourself and your presentation to your target market.

As a business owner, you need to contact local and national organizations in your area of expertise and tell them you’re looking for speaking engagements. Search for business events where you could talk about your products and services. Depending on your niche, you can go to schools, colleges, libraries and social clubs to make informative speeches. Tell them about your business and ask for permission to hold a speech. Find a way to tie your message to theirs to maximize your opportunities.

5. Get the Audience Involved

Inviting your audience to be active participants in your performance is one of the best ways to ensure engagement and connection. Encourage questions and sharing of ideas—create a dialogue. Ask people to stand up, group themselves, and share one or two things they found useful in your presentation. Tell them why you enjoy speaking about this topic and how your speech can help them.

The audience was abuzz, and Taylor was elated—a combination of relief from conquering a fear and the knowledge that his performance was the first-step in elevating his brand and business.

Follow Taylor’s lead and dive into the world of public speaking. There’s no better way to boost your business and increase name-recognition and visibility.

About the Author

Scott Topper, three time Emmy Nominated TV Show Host, and Corporate Improv Skills Coach, helps organizations and individuals learn business improvisational skills and theatrical techniques to achieve better sales presentation results and gain confidence through his fun, interactive corporate presentation skills workshops. Scott offers a monthly coaching mentoring newsletter, and has authored over 30 public speaking books, audio books, workbooks, DVD’s, and downloadable confident speaking courses. For more information about Scott, contact him at www.IMproSolutions.com, (818) 640-6100, or Scott@IMproSolutions.com.

Tags: , , , , ,

Category: Features